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Powell: Poverty aids terrorism
graphic February 1, 2002: 3:30 p.m. ET

Vows U.S. action on both 'wherever it threatens free men and women.'
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  • Special Report: 2002 World Economic Forum
  • Globalization gains in popularity -- Feb. 1, 2002
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    NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Speaking at the World Economic Forum Friday morning, Secretary of State Colin Powell promised to follow through with the campaign on terrorism by going after its root: poverty.

    "We have to make sure that, as we fight terrorism using military means and legal means ... we also have to put hope back into the hearts of people," Powell said.  "We have to show people who might move in the direction of terrorism that there is a better way."

    Powell shared the stage with other leaders, including European Union Foreign Policy Chief Javier Solana and NATO Secretary-General George Robertson, answering questions about the global war on terrorism during the morning session.

    He stressed that the United States must "keep our eye on the mission" of rooting out terrorists, noting the work is not yet done.

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    "We must go after terrorism wherever it threatens free men and women," Powell said.  "We can't just stop with a single terrorist or a single terrorist organization, we have to root out the whole system."        

    The annual conference, which began Thursday, is in New York this year instead of its regular venue of Davos, Switzerland, as a gesture of solidarity with the city hardest hit in the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. It comes in the midst of a global economic downturn.

    Nearly 2,700 participants, including business and political leaders, from 106 countries are attending this year's forum, which ends Monday.

    The organizers of the annual forum -- commonly referred to as Davos, where it has been held regularly for the past 32 years -- in early November announced their decision to hold it this year in New York City. The meeting is expected to return to Davos next year.

    Discussions at the forum have led to important shifts in global trade policy, eventually resulting in such real-world changes as the North American Free Trade Agreement and the Uruguay round of trade talks that led to the formation of the WTO. 

    However, protesters at this event and other world economic forums believe the international move toward a globalized economy leaves poorer nations behind, allowing large corporations to take advantage of workers in these nations by paying them lower wages. graphic

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    Special Report: 2002 World Economic Forum

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