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Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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graphic
Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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graphic
Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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graphic
Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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graphic
Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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graphic
Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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graphic
Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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graphic
Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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graphic
Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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graphic
Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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graphic
Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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graphic
Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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graphic
Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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graphic
Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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graphic
Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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graphic
Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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graphic
Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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graphic
Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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graphic
Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

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Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

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Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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graphic
Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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graphic
Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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graphic
Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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graphic
Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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graphic
Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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graphic
Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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graphic
Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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graphic
Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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graphic
Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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graphic
Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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graphic
Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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graphic
Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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graphic
Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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graphic
Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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graphic
Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

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Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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graphic
Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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News > Technology
graphic
Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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News > Technology
graphic
Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
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News > Technology
graphic
Intel, Clearwire create wireless tech
World's largest chipmaker says it will invest in Clearwire to promote global wireless networks.
October 25, 2004: 3:38 PM EDT

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Intel will team up with telecommunications pioneer Craig McCaw to jointly develop and deploy portable wireless broadband technology, Intel said a statement Monday.

While specific financial terms were not disclosed, the world's largest chip maker said its strategic investment program, Intel Capital, will substantially invest in McCaw's company, Clearwire.

The investment is part of Intel Capital's $150 million investment strategy to encourage adoption of high-speed wireless networks worldwide.

Clearwire uses a wireless modem called NextNet that can be plugged into a computer or laptop that transmits signals to and from nearby cellular towers instead of using traditional phone lines. The company said this allows users to set up the modem anywhere in the home or office and have a secure connection that is always on.

"WiMax technology has spawned a global community that continues to gain momentum, and we as an industry have achieved some important milestones this past year," said Sean Maloney, Intel executive vice president and general manager of the Intel Communications Group, in a statement.

"Carriers, equipment makers and solution providers around the world are moving quickly to lay the foundation for building this new global network," said Maloney.

McCaw's Clearwire hopes to set up a nationwide network offering broadband Internet access, with its first service opening recently in Jacksonville, Fla. Customers in the city's Clearwire network simply connect their computers to a NextNet modem and receive Internet access anywhere within the coverage area.

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS
Intel, Clearwire to develop portable wireless technology - Oct. 25, 2004
CNN/Money One for credit card only hard offer form at $9.95 One for risk-free form at $14.95 w/ $9.95 upsell