Our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy have changed.

By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to the new Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.

This Mazda recall really burns my ...

by Peter Valdes-Dapena, senior writer

NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) -- Mazda is in the hot seat Wednesday after recalling 12,300 CX-9 crossover SUVs over potentially overheating seats.

In some CX-9s equipped with electrically heated seats, the seat heater control circuit can overheat and fail due to insufficient electrical grounding. This can cause burn damage to the seat surface and, in the worst case, there is a risk of smoke and fire, according to documents from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

2010 Mazda CX-9

Owners of SUVs potentially involved in the recall will be notified by mail. They will be asked to take their vehicle to a Mazda dealer to have a new ground wire harness installed.

In some cases, the the entire seat heater control circuit may be replaced and the seat repaired, if needed.

The problem came to the carmakers' attention in December when a dealer reported an incident in which a CX-9 seat heater could not be turned off even when the ignition key was turned all the way to the "Off" position.

As a result, the SUVs battery was drained and the seat was scorched.

"We immediately initiated an investigation into the matter," Mazda said in a recall-related document filed with the National Highway Transportation Association. To top of page

Find Your Next Car
Index Last Change % Change
Dow 18,223.03 77.32 0.43%
Nasdaq 5,309.83 52.43 1.00%
S&P 500 2,151.33 10.17 0.47%
Treasuries 1.76 0.02 1.32%
Data as of 10:09pm ET
Company Price Change % Change
AT&T Inc 36.86 -0.63 -1.68%
Bank of America Corp... 16.77 0.10 0.60%
Chesapeake Energy Co... 6.36 -0.32 -4.79%
Microsoft Corp 61.00 1.34 2.25%
Time Warner Inc 86.74 -2.74 -3.06%
Data as of 4:15pm ET


One of the clear messages from Consumer Reports dependability survey was that cars that have recently been totally redesigned tend be less dependable. More

Stocks are widely expected to drop close to 10% if Trump wins the presidency. But even if Clinton wins, stocks could still sell-off the day after the election. More

Microsoft is raising prices in the U.K. by whopping 22%, in response to the collapsing value of the pound. More

The University of Illinois partnered with Coursera to launch one of the most affordable online MBA programs yet. More