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Chase is back online - sort of

By Aaron Smith, staff writer


NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) -- Chase's online banking service was back Wednesday, but service was sporadic.

The intermittent service was apparently the first time that some Chase customers have been able to access their online accounts since the three-day hiatus from Internet banking began Monday afternoon.

Chase spokeswoman Christine Holevas said some 16.6 million customers have been affected by the outage, which was caused by "technical issues."

Customers can still conduct banking in other ways, said Holevas: by ATM or telephone, or by visiting a branch office.

She said that customers who have been unable to pay bills because of the outage and have incurred fees can have those fees refunded by Chase.

"If a customer incurred a late fee during this outage, they should call us via telephone banking or go into a branch, and we will rescind that late fee," she said. "If they incurred these fees during the outage because they could not make a payment any other way, then it is our responsibility and we will refund that late fee."

She said this even applies in situations where a customer owes a late fee to a rival company, such as credit card issuer Discover (DFS, Fortune 500).

Chase is the banking division of JPMorgan Chase (JPM, Fortune 500). To top of page

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