What's next for retiree health care

  @Money November 7, 2013: 5:21 PM ET
retirement guide pills money

Fewer companies are offering retiree health care benefits. Even if you get benefits from a former boss, you'll see some changes.

(Money Magazine)

Companies have been cutting back on retiree health benefits for years. Indeed, the latest survey by the Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) found that among large firms with employee health coverage, just 28% offer some form of retiree benefits, down from 66% in 1988. Among smaller firms, help is even scarcer.

Disappearing corporate benefits is one reason the new public exchanges created by Obamacare will be such a boon to early retirees. But even for seniors who still get help from a former boss, change is afoot, no matter your age.

Here's what to watch for:

Early retirees: If the public exchanges succeed, firms that offer pre-Medicare coverage may give those ex-workers funds to buy a policy on one, says Tricia Neuman, director of KFF's Program on Medicare Policy. Employers are taking a wait-and-see approach, but that could change fast.

Related: You needn't fear losing health insurance

Retirees 65 and up: About a third of Medicare recipients have supplemental coverage from a former employer, says Neuman, and some of them are already seeing changes. Several major companies, recently IBM and Time Warner (MONEY's parent company), are shifting retirees 65 and older from company-run plans to private exchanges operated by benefit consultants and insurance brokers.

On a private exchange, you'll be able to pick supplemental Medicare coverage from a host of options, using funds your employer contributes to a tax-free health-reimbursement arrangement, or HRA.

For now, companies making this shift aren't necessarily cutting back on how much they're spending on your health care, says Paul Fronstin, a senior research associate at the Employee Benefit Research Institute (though IBM capped its contribution years ago). But how you'll fare over time will depend on the employer subsidy keeping up with premium hikes, says John Grosso, health care actuary at Aon Hewitt. If not, you'll pay more.

How I talk to my spouse about retirement

You or your parents may leap at the chance for more choices, or be overwhelmed by the sign-up process. It's similar to open enrollment, but with potentially more options.

Related: 10 Best Places to Retire

"Make use of all the tools out there," says Sandy Ageloff, Southwest health and group benefits leader for Towers Watson, which owns Extend Health, the biggest private exchange. Tools include phone counseling at the exchange; the typical initial call runs about 80 minutes, Ageloff says.

MORE: New rules for early retirement

Rule 1: Early retirees: Don't fear losing your health insurance
Rule 2: Getting ready to retire? Save more, spend less
Rule 3: Use your home to boost retirement savings
Rule 4: Get the first decade of retirement right
Rule 5: Retiring? Time to look for a part-time gig To top of page

Send a letter to the editor about this story to money_letters@moneymail.com.


A new approach to delivering benefits
Companies that offer retiree health plans are reconsidering their options in light of the new exchanges.
Employers saying they are somewhat likely to.... 2014 2015
Drop sponsored coverage for pre-65 retirees 10% 38%
Drop sponsored coverage for 65+ retirees 25% 44%
NOTE: Midsize and large companies.
SOURCE: Towers Watson 2013 Health Care Changes Ahead survey

Join the Conversation
Overnight Avg Rate Latest Change Last Week
30 yr fixed4.41%4.44%
15 yr fixed3.33%3.31%
5/1 ARM3.34%3.55%
30 yr refi4.39%4.41%
15 yr refi3.31%3.30%
View rates in your area
 
Find personalized rates:
Rate data provided
by Bankrate.com
CNNMoney Sponsors
Market indexes are shown in real time, except for the DJIA, which is delayed by two minutes. All times are ET. Disclaimer LIBOR Warning: Neither BBA Enterprises Limited, nor the BBA LIBOR Contributor Banks, nor Reuters, can be held liable for any irregularity or inaccuracy of BBA LIBOR. Disclaimer. Morningstar: © 2014 Morningstar, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Disclaimer The Dow Jones IndexesSM are proprietary to and distributed by Dow Jones & Company, Inc. and have been licensed for use. All content of the Dow Jones IndexesSM © 2014 is proprietary to Dow Jones & Company, Inc. Chicago Mercantile Association. The market data is the property of Chicago Mercantile Exchange Inc. and its licensors. All rights reserved. FactSet Research Systems Inc. 2014. All rights reserved. Most stock quote data provided by BATS.