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What would you pay for a drone bartender?

drone champagne
Las Vegas revelers await their Champagne -- delivered by drone.
NEW YORK (CNNMoney)

The time of signaling for the bartender is over.

Now you can have your drinks brought directly to you ... via drone.

The Marquee Dayclub at the The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas hotel has begun offering bottle service by drone to guests partying at its outdoor deck and cabanas. The service debuted to an excited crowd Memorial Day weekend.

"The guests just went wild," said Jason Strauss, co-owner of Tao Group, which is behind the property. "The drone was the celebrity of the day." He said it got more attention than any celebrity that has been through the club's doors in the last six months.

Related: Get your documents by drone...in Dubai

The new star didn't start out as a cocktail waitress. The club first acquired it to take aerial shots for promotional purposes. Then someone told Strauss the drone could hold up to eight pounds.

The average weight of a standard bottle of Champagne? Four pounds.

An idea -- and a new kind of celebrity -- was born.

He said that when the drone appears and drops the bottle into the hands of the customer, everyone cheers.

"It's almost like a sporting event," he said.

For now, the cost of the service is on a case-by-case basis. Though rumors swirling online put the opening day cost at $20,000 per order, Strauss played that down, and said the price would depend on how many people ordered the service in a given day. He also said patrons can order nearly any type of liquor, as long as it fits within the weight requirements.

The more people ordering drone delivery, the cheaper the service.

Related: This drone can steal what's on your phone

"For us this was just a fun initiative to tap into the latest tech," Strauss said. "We're always continuing to push the envelope." As the drone makes the drop, it takes an aerial shot of the group that the customer can take home (or #highrollers can post to Instagram).

Robot bartender mixes it up

And Strauss might be pushing that envelope elsewhere. The group owns several venues in New York City, and he said they're looking to see which rooftop bars or pool decks are the most drone-friendly.

And for those in other cities, drone delivery for goods might not be too far off. A Silicon Valley duo recently showed off their burrito-delivering drone prototype to CNN, and let's not forget about the Domino's DomiCopter.

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