ClassPass kills beloved unlimited plan

I'm addicted...to working out
I'm addicted...to working out

ClassPass is getting rid of its signature unlimited plan.

On Wednesday, ClassPass founder Payal Kadakia wrote an open letter notifying members that ClassPass was discontinuing the plan that helped thrust the startup into the spotlight.

Kadakia describes the unlimited option as a promotion that helped the company take off in 2014. It became the company's standard package, granting members unlimited classes at boutique fitness studios.

But that option isn't a viable business, Kadakia admitted on Wednesday.

In its place, Kadakia painteda picture of a ClassPass that's customized to individuals, "membership options that inspired people to take class, that were flexible enough to work for everyone and that were priced sustainably."

Related: Here's what it takes to be a ClassPass superuser

The writing had been on the wall. The company had been hiking up pricing on its unlimited plan in certain cities and introducing a new tiered model. The unlimited option went from $99 a month to as much as $180 per month in Boston.

Unlimited members will get to keep their plans for another full billing cycle before they'll have to switch it up.

The company offers a "Base" 5-class plan (which runs from $40 to $75 depending on the city) and a "Core" 10-class plan (which runs $75 to $135). Add-on packs are also available -- but for hardcore users, none of the other plans will come close to the unlimited option.

Kadakia also teased a broader vision for ClassPass, which has raised $84 million in funding, including on-demand video. And as a peace offering, ClassPass is giving members 10 free classes a month for the first three months of their new plan.

Still, members aren't happy, and many are taking it personally.

"I've been a member since Dec 2014 and this is the worst thank you," tweeted one user.

"Thank you @classpass for ruining my life, faith in humanity and beach bod," tweeted another.

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