Ecology
big data apes

Recognizing faces -- not just human ones

A team of German scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and the Fraunhofer Institutes for Digital Media Technology and Integrated Circuits took human-facial-recognition technology and used it to track apes. By pairing it with audio recordings, the scientists could home in on specific animals. Scientists are now using the system to understand how the population of a chimpanzee colony shifts over time, adding to our knowledge of a chimp's social networks.


- Last updated September 10 2012 06:07 PM ET
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