Table of contents: VOL. 5, NO. 9 - October 1, 2004
COVER STORY
HOW TO GET AHEAD IN THE POSTBUBBLE WORLD: BUILD A COMPANY CHEAP. FLIP IT FAST. REPEAT. (more)

Features
GLOBAL COMPETITION IS MORE INTENSE THAN EVER. NEW THREATS MAY UNDERMINE OUR NATION'S ABILITY TO STAY AHEAD. JEFFREY PFEFFER HAS SOME THOUGHTS ABOUT WHAT UNCLE SAM SHOULD DO. (more)
Riding a huge comeback, Research in Motion finds itself surrounded by rivals, all gunning for a share of the booming wireless market it created. (more)
WHY A TINY FIRM CALLED NTP SAYS IT DESERVES A BITE OF RIM'S PROFITS. (more)
RIM'S TOUGHEST-TALKING RIVAL HAS JUST 2,600 CUSTOMERS—BUT IT ALSO HAS A PLAN TO LET THE PC INDUSTRY IN ON THE WIRELESS E-MAIL BONANZA. (more)
DEFICITS ARE CLIMBING AND GOVERNMENT SPENDING IS ON THE RISE. TOUGH DECISIONS NEED TO BE MADE. JOHN HEILEMANN LOOKS AT WHO HAS WHAT IT TAKES TO SAFEGUARD AMERICA'S ECONOMIC FUTURE. (more)
It's hard enough to woo investors who have never heard of your company. Imagine if they've never heard of your country. (more)
Are we there yet? Not quite. But look for these innovations to truly arrive in the year ahead. (more)

With new ideas, timing is everything. Here are seven innovations that took off in the last 12 months. (more)
This year's winner is attacking the very foundations of the telecom industry. (more)






Erik Blachford controls half of the online travel market—and Barry Diller's Net ambitions are riding on his shoulders. So why is the CEO of IAC Travel so relaxed? (more)
Bonus: Car-tech Special
Swap headlights for LEDs and what do you get? A car that's easy on the eyes. (more)
Bonus: Car-Tech Special
The original alternative to the gasoline engine is back and better than ever. (more)
The future finish is a plastic film that's cheap, glossy, and incredibly durable. (more)
Volvo's latest safety technology eliminates the blind spot. (more)
A BMW outpost deep in Silicon Valley is hunting for the car industry's next big thing. The results so far? Don't ask. (more)
At Toyota, special orders now go from zero to built in no time flat. (more)
The car of tomorrow is packed with more electronic brainpower than ever, delivering unprecedented performance, safety, and style. (more)

Hits & Misses

In Front







The government's data says Americans are working fewer hours. But you're still staying at the office every night. What gives? (more)
What Works
By launching a host of splashy new ad formats, CEO Shelby Bonnie helped lead the dramatic comeback of online advertising. (more)
How Western Union turned a dying U.S. business—money transfers—into a runaway success for a booming market: Foreign-born workers. (more)
How an obscure little design firm helps giants like Estée Lauder, Nike, and Target build cutting-edge products out of the coolest new stuff. (more)
They look like Justins, but wear like sneakers. How a startup shoemaker called Ariat is persuading cowboys to switch brands. (more)
Japan's Jomo is winning customers by redesigning its stations to make lingering fun. (more)
CEO Jack Messman is using Ximian's hacker culture to reinvent his software company. (more)
Most bosses want to hear only good news. That's bad news, since it pushes people to fudge and equivocate. Want to stay ahead? Insist on the cold, hard facts. (more)
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