Table of contents: VOL. 6, NO. 7 - August 1, 2005
COVER STORY
American entrepreneurs are overcoming cultural, regulatory, and other barriers to build fortunes in one of the greatest booms in history. Here's how they've done it, and how you can do it too. (more)

Features
WHAT DO CRUISE SHIPS, PIZZA, AND SHAVING CREAM HAVE IN COMMON? STELIOS HAJI-IOANNOU IS TRYING TO REINVENT THEM--AND ANY OTHER BUSINESS WHERE, AS HE PUTS IT, "CONSUMERS ARE BEING RIPPED OFF." (more)
WITH SECRET MAPS, STATE-OF-THE-ART TURBINES, AND A LITTLE LUCK OF THE IRISH, A DUBLIN-BASED GREEN-ENERGY STARTUP IS DOING WHAT SO MANY OTHERS HAVEN'T: TURNING A PROFIT BY GENERATING ELECTRICITY OUT OF THIN AIR. (more)
IT USES LESS POWER THAN A NIGHT-LIGHT AND PLUGS INTO A TV. BEST OF ALL, AS THE FIRST $100 COMPUTER, IT'S AFFORDABLE ENOUGH TO PROPEL THE REST OF THE WORLD INTO THE DIGITAL AGE. (more)
Kathleen Lau quickly learned that Chinese roots don't guarantee success in China. (more)
FROM BERKELEY TO BANGALORE, HERE'S WHERE TO GO FOR AN ADVANCE LOOK AT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN USE TODAY. (more)
How do you get people to pay for a Web browser? Opera Software CEO Jon von Tetzchner found the answer by diving into wireless. (more)
hits & misses

what's cool
It's not easy getting your hands on a Morgan Aero 8. But if you're one of the lucky few, you'll be flying through the streets in a roadster unlike any other. (more)
THE BUSINESS TOOLS YOU CAN'T WORK WITHOUT[*] (more)


When e-mail crosses borders, a faux pas could be just a click away. Here's how to avoid international inbox offenses. (more)
what's next


Japanese pundit Kenichi Ohmae sees the awakening giant as a customer, not a threat. Unless democracy comes too quickly--then all bets are off. (more)






what works
Silicon Valley's Village Enterprise Fund backs its startups $100 at a time. Which, in rural east Africa, leads to some pretty amazing returns. (more)
By focusing on tiny rural casinos, Australia's Aristocrat turned dying small-coin slots into gaming's hottest new product. (more)
Katsuhiko Machida's big bet on LCD TVs turned Sharp into Japan's most profitable electronics maker. (more)
Germany's Kuka found new growth by turning industrial machines into theme-park attractions and movie stars. (more)
HTC has become the company wireless carriers turn to when they go shopping for handsets. (more)
How a little-known Israeli telecom became the world's most successful incubator. (more)
By taking neuromarketing out of the lab and into the mall, a small British firm is helping world-class advertisers make their pitches more effective. (more)
The brothers Freitag struck it rich by turning grimy truckers' tarps into the trendiest bags on the street. (more)
Never mind the touchy-feely stuff--international diversity is essential for companies that hope to thrive in today's economy. (more)
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