Table of contents: VOL. 6, NO. 9 - October 1, 2005
COVER STORY
WHAT WILL THE WORLD BE LIKE IN 2008? GET READY TO EMBRACE THE CHANGES THAT WILL SHAPE THE FUTURE OF YOUR BUSINESS. (more)

Features
The most important demographic in advertising--18- to 34-year-old males--is also the most elusive. How do you make them sit up and take notice? By turning away from TV and finding clever new hooks to get their attention. (more)
LED BY A BRITISH EXPAT AND A VISIONARY CROWN PRINCE, DUBAI'S FLAG CARRIER HAS GROWN INTO ONE OF THE MOST SUCCESSFUL--AND DESPISED--AIRLINES IN THE WORLD. (more)
Unilever's body spray became an instant hit by going where the guys are--and knowing what's always on their minds. (more)
(IN NO PARTICULAR ORDER) (more)
INNOVATION ALWAYS HAS THE POWER TO DISRUPT BUSINESS. HERE'S WHAT TO WATCH IN THE YEARS AHEAD (more)

How intelligent built-in safety features could help us avoid the big one. (more)
FROM STUTTGART TO DETROIT TO TOKYO, THEY'RE WORKING ON THE CAR OF TOMORROW. HERE'S WHAT'S COMING DOWN THE ROAD. (more)
In the wake of the Prius--and sky-high gas prices--carmakers start finding ways to give us bang for our three bucks. (more)
Gates & Co. have tried--and failed--to port their OS onto the dashboard. But a cheaper, stripped-down version might just get there yet. (more)
How do you pitch an old man's ride to the octane-boost set? By reinventing it, natch. (more)
Want broadband on the road? Decent options are finally here--for a price. (more)
Ford figured out a way to save millions--not to mention Mother Earth--by plugging paint fumes into the power grid. (more)
Google's Omid Kordestani conjured a formula that took its sales to $3 billion. Now he's rethinking the world of advertising again. (more)
hits & misses

what's cool
THE BUSINESS TOOLS YOU CAN'T WORK WITHOUT[*] (more)

Relax. Here are five tips to help you navigate the menu at your next business meal. (more)
what's next


As larger rivals circle, BEA Systems CEO Alfred Chuang says he wants to keep his software company floating free. (more)



A telecom-bust refugee reversed his fortunes by coming up with a way to trade Internet connectivity just like pork bellies. (more)




what works
How does Plantronics dominate the headset market? It's all about finding the right fit. (more)
Hardee's Thickburger revived the troubled restaurant chain by enticing diners to binge. (more)
Allstate has boosted its profits and share price by looking beyond driving records. (more)
Online ticket seller Fandango is finding that its customers' opinions are more valuable than their money. (more)
More and more manufacturers are opening their own stores. Here's what allows some to thrive while others fail. (more)
Yoox.com exploits its Italian home base to challenge online fashion competitors. (more)
India's Edelweiss Capital has made its reputation--and fortune--by modeling itself after Wall Street titans. (more)
Lobo Systems's easy-to-raise platforms let companies focus on the real job. (more)
Steve Hill started with his pals. Then he had a brainstorm: Why not give his discount to all of America? (more)
Some management gurus say high turnover is a good thing. Are they crazy? (more)
wheels
The cabbies can't stop talking about it, but that's not a result of the familiar hue. Nope, the allure of the Lamborghini Gallardo is all about the 500 horses revving under the hood. (more)
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