Table of contents: VOL. 6, NO. 10 - November 1, 2005
COVER STORY
In the coming 25 years, the biggest wave of development since World War II will turn America's major metro areas into giant "megapolitans" teeming with opportunity. Want to get in? We've found some strategies that are already paying dividends. (more)

Features
Utility giant AES's plan to electrify the benighted country of Cameroon almost imploded. Now it's shaping up as one of the most unusual turnarounds in global business. (more)
Startups are hot--again. Valuations are nuts--again. Fortunes are being made--again. Here's how to play it right this time. (more)
Long-term growth depends on rehabbing not just the physical infrastructure, but also the economic. (more)
Ten megapolitans are poised for a development boom that, by 2030, will dwarf America's post-WWII buildout. Here's our treasure map of potential opportunity. (more)
Which places will mint millionaires faster than others? The next generation of edge cities, each primed for hypergrowth. (more)
FOR MICROSOFT, THE NEW XBOX IS THE BIGGEST LAUNCH SINCE WINDOWS 95. FOR THE MAN LEADING THE CHARGE, IT'S ALSO A CHANCE FOR REVENGE AGAINST SONY'S PLAYSTATION MASTERMIND. (more)

Samsung Electronics CEO Jong-Yong Yun wants to dominate the digital world--inside and out. (more)
hits & misses

what's cool
THE BUSINESS TOOLS YOU CAN'T WORK WITHOUT[*] (more)

Need to be reachable halfway around the globe? Here are three relatively hassle-free options. (more)
Sit back, stretch out, and plug in: How to get the most out of your flights. (more)
Mercedes would prefer that you call its new R-Class a "grand sports tourer." Might as well, since it drives nothing like the family truckster of yore. (more)

what's next




Excite co-founder Joe Kraus says cheap technology makes this the perfect time to start a new company--which gives him an invaluable chance to prove himself again. (more)




COMPANIES, PEOPLE, AND PRODUCTS TO KEEP AN EYE ON THIS MONTH. (more)
what works
By starting small but thinking big, sugar substitute Splenda pulled off one of the most successful consumer-product launches in history. (more)
When, why, and how to change a company's most valuable asset. (more)
With a shrewd marketing strategy and lots of advanced technology, CEO George Buckley turned 160-year-old Brunswick into the biggest player in the pleasure craft business. (more)
By allowing his top scientists to peek over the horizon, 3M's Larry Wendling helped turn a century-old giant into a nanotech pioneer. (more)
London's SavRow steered clear of commodity-product traffic by offering technology buffs a Formula 1 version of the personal computer. (more)
Gensler designers translate brands into distinctive buildings that convey the essence of a company's values. (more)
How Bill McNally turned his idea for an antibacterial fabric into a $50 million sensation. (more)
Executives face a lot of tough questions. But the best leaders will confess that they don't have all the answers. (more)
Its first product was a huge success. But the $640 million toymaker has since become too uncool for school. (more)
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