Ransomware attack: Who's been hit

Ransomware 'WannaCry' attack explained
Ransomware 'WannaCry' attack explained

The world's biggest cyberattack has hit at least 150 countries and infected 300,000 machines since it started spreading last Friday.

The victims include hospitals, universities, manufacturers and government agencies in countries like Britain, China, Russia, Germany and Spain.

The list of institutions has grown as more become aware of hacks and as variants of the virus spread.

Related: Worldwide cyberattack sparks fewer aftershocks than feared

Global Companies

FedEx: The company said this weekend it was "experiencing interference with some of our Windows-based systems caused by malware" and was trying to fix the problems as quickly as possible. By Monday, the company said it had resumed "normal operations."

Nissan: The carmaker said in a statement that "some Nissan entities were recently targeted" but "there has been no major impact on our business."

Are you affected by the global cyberattack? Have you paid the ransom? You can text or WhatsApp us at +1 347-322-0415

China

Colleges: Internet security firm Qihoo360 issued a "red alert" over the weekend, saying a large number of colleges and students in China had been hit by the ransomware attack.

Gas stations: State-run media in China reported that some gas stations saw their digital payment systems shut down, forcing customers to bring cash.

Germany

Deutsche Bahn: The German railway company told CNNMoney that due to the attack "passenger information displays in some stations were inoperative" as were "some ticket machines."

Japan

Hitachi: The Japanese electronics firm said Monday that its computer systems have been experiencing problems since the weekend, including not being able to send and receive emails or open attached files. Hitachi (HTHIY) said it believed the difficulties are linked to the global cyberattack but they haven't so far harmed its business operations.

Russia

Russian Central Bank: State media agency Tass reported the bank discovered malware bulk emails to banks but detected no compromise of resources. The central bank reportedly said those monitoring the cyberattacks found "no incidents compromising data resources of banking institutions."

Russian Railways: State media said a virus attacked the IT system of Russian Railways, but it did not affect operations due to a prompt response. The company said the virus has been localized and "technical work is underway to destroy it and update the antivirus protection."

Interior Ministry: The Russian Interior Ministry acknowledged a ransomware attack on its computers, adding that less than 1% of computers were affected. The statement said antivirus systems are working to destroy it.

Megafon: A spokesperson for Russian telecommunications company Megafon told CNN that the cyberattack affected call centers but not the company's networks. He said the situation was under control.

Spain

Telefónica: Spanish authorities confirmed the Spanish telecom company Telefónica (TEF) was one of the targets, though the attack affected only some computers and did not compromise the security of clients' information.

United Kingdom

National Health Service: At least sixteen NHS organizations have been hit, according to NHS Digital. "At this stage, we do not have any evidence that patient data has been accessed. We will continue to work with affected (organizations) to confirm this," the agency said. The NHS has said hospitals have had to cancel some outpatient appointments because of the attack.

The UK government called a meeting of its crisis response committee, known as Cobra, to discuss how to handle the situation. The British Home Secretary said most of the NHS systems were back to normal by midday Saturday.

India

State police: Police in the southern Indian state of Andhra Pradesh said 25% of its systems were hit by the attack late Saturday. The state's Deputy Superintendent of Police, Palle Joshua, told CNNMoney that the impact would have been greater, but many districts took their systems offline as soon as the first attacks hit. "Our cybercrime teams are currently working to retrieve lost data," Joshua said.

United States

Department of Homeland Security: A Homeland Security official said Monday that a "small number" of infrastructure systems were hit by the attack, but that none of the disruption was "significant." The official would not identify which systems but said no federal government entities were hit.

The FBI declined to comment on any investigation into the attack.

--CNN's David Shortell contributed to this story.

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