What happens when your business is named Isis

How ISIS makes its millions
How ISIS makes its millions

Isis Financial Services is a small company in New Zealand. ISIS is a murderous band of terrorists who have conquered large parts of Iraq and Syria.

You can see the problem facing Lisa Hotton, who founded the Kiwi debt collection firm. After months of consideration, and a few death threats, she has given in and changed the company's name.

Hotton's firm is now called Bay Debt Services.

"I swore that I wasn't going to change it, but I had messages sent to me," Hotton said. "People were threatening me, saying I would have my head chopped off."

Hotton said she started Isis Financial Services in 2004, picking a name that honored Egypt.

"I was so interested in Egyptian history, the customs and beliefs," Hotton said. "The Isis goddess stands for everything that is good: love, marriage and health. It's not what is being put across these days."

"I'm keeping the goddess Isis as the company logo," she added.

Related: How ISIS makes (and takes) money

Hotton said that the Isis name had cost her business in recent months. Even some loyal customers suggested she should consider a new brand.

It's a problem that hundreds of business around the world are facing. Isis, a mobile wallet service founded by AT&T, Verizon and T-Mobile, changed its name last year in order to avoid any confusion.

"However coincidental, we have no interest in sharing a name with a group whose name has become synonymous with violence and our hearts go out to those who are suffering," the mobile company said at the time.

One of the world's leading centers for physics and life sciences research is located in the U.K. and also called Isis. It hasn't announced a rebranding yet.

Hotton said she had received support from friends following the name change, and positive messages on Facebook. She's now looking forward to a new start.

"I just love the reason I took the name, and what has happened lately really annoys me," she said.

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