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Sun Microsystems to cut up to 6,000 jobs

In cost-cutting move, the computer company said it would reduce its payroll by up to 18% and restructure its software business operations.

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NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) -- Software and computer networking company Sun Microsystems, Inc. announced Friday it will cut up to 18%, or 6,000, of its staff in a cost-cutting move.

Santa Clara, Calif.-based Sun said it's acting to "align its cost model with the global economic climate." The company said it plans to restructure its software business operations, aligning into three divisions: application development, systems platforms, and infrastructure development.

"Today, we have taken decisive actions to align Sun's business with global economic realities and accelerate our delivery of key open source platform innovations," said Jonathan Schwartz, chief executive of Sun Microsystems, in a statement.

Sun Microsystems (JAVA, Fortune 500) is the maker of the Java computer programming software. Its shares fell 4% in premarket trading. To top of page

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