Table of contents: VOL. 152, NO. 6 - September 19, 2005
COVER STORY
Only one man could have written the sentence that appeared in that long-ago prospectus for a new magazine: "Accurately, vividly and concretely to describe Modern business is the greatest journalistic assignment in history." (more)

Features
No, but CEO Rick Wagoner is working overtime to make sure his company rises to the life-and-death challenges ahead. (more)
She has stood toe-to-toe with imperial CEOs, exposed major frauds, and played some serious bridge with Buffett. Now our intrepid reporter takes on her toughest subject yet. (more)
Dynasties don't last forever. But Estée Lauder's grandkids aren't about to let this beauty empire crumble. (more)
Twenty-five years ago a law known as Bayh-Dole spawned the biotech industry. It made lots of university scientists fabulously rich. It was also supposed to usher in a new era of innovation. So why are medical miracles in such short supply? (more)
Of the millions of words we've published, there are some, frankly, that we would like to take back. For example, last year some madwoman who spells her name just like mine was certain that $40 oil would never stick. Hey, nobody's prefect. (more)
When it comes to gazing into the future, FORTUNE has made some predictions we recall with pride. We identified the Organization Man in the '50s, wrote of suburban sprawl in the '60s, and spotted a little company called Microsoft in the early '80s. Here are a few more. (more)
As a tour of corporate gatherings around the U.S. suggests, you've got to have faith to keep the company alive and well. (more)
In 1936 this magazine sent a poet and a photographer to Hale County in Alabama to document the lives of sharecroppers. The result wasn't published in these pages, but became a celebrated book. Sixty-nine years later, we return. (more)
He dazzles crowds. He brews conventional wisdom. He charms CEOs. And he drives some people crazy. Meet Tom Friedman, the oracle of the Global Century. (more)
Impersonating the famous tire guy, our reporter (above) bathed in love and in sweat. Nothing new for this 107-year-old icon. A true tale of serendipity, survival, and brand management. (more)
Tough, tireless, coolly rational, Jeff Immelt is remaking GE. His team is with him, but his strategy isn't working where it counts most--in the stock. (more)
Bing: While You Were Out

FORTUNE SMALL BUSINESS
I wasn't focused on fighting my overseas rivals--until a big customer defected to China. (more)
How The World Will Work
Through 75 tumultuous years, this magazine has held on to a fundamental optimism about tomorrow. Of course there are problems. But here's to all the promise. (more)
Portfolio

SCRAPBOOK: BIG IDEAS
Startling topics, newly coined words--"trophy wife," anyone?--it's not all business around here. (more)
SCRAPBOOK: BOOMS & BUSTS
From the Dust Bowl to the condo bubble--75 years is long enough for many reversals of fortune. (more)
SCRAPBOOK: CEOS
The folks in the corner offices--big titles, big paychecks, big personalities--always make great copy. (more)
SCRAPBOOK: DYNASTIES
Succession is hard. With few exceptions, the family that works together doesn't stay together. (more)
SCRAPBOOK: GOVERNMENT
The business world has to keep an eye on politicos, whether they're in D.C. or closer to home. (more)
SCRAPBOOK: SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Forget dot-com billionaires. We started talking tech in the '30s and never quit. (more)
SCRAPBOOK: THE COMPANY
Big business--how it works and fails to work--has always been our bread and butter. (more)
Technology
Samsung's VIP Center is home to a uniquely paranoid culture--and that's the way the boss likes it. (more)
TECHNOLOGY
Ever wonder what went into making that amazing device in your pocket? Samsung's latest music-playing camera phone took a year to design, requires a mere eight seconds to assemble, and--if it's a hit--could end up in ten million hands worldwide. We coaxed one out of its shell. (more)
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