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Looking for a post-college job? Try accounting

By Blake Ellis, staff reporter


NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) -- College graduates looking for jobs in accounting, engineering and finance were in luck this year.

Employers in these areas extended the most job offers to this year's graduating class of bachelor's degree students, according to a report from the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

Graduates entering jobs in engineering were offered the highest annual salary, an average of $56,367. Jobs in accounting paid an entry-level salary of $50,402, while financial service organizations promised an average $49,703 to their new hires.

Employers sought students who were already prepared for the jobs, the association's report showed.

Accounting jobs went mainly to accounting majors, while engineering companies hired mechanical, electrical and civil engineers. Finance and accounting majors were offered the bulk of jobs at financial services organizations.

The association's report, published quarterly, tracks salary offers to new college graduates in 70 disciplines and collects data from college and university career centers across the country.  To top of page

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