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Small N.Y. hamlet gets big train-car contract

By Julianne Pepitone, staff reporter


NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) -- The town of Elmira, an upstate New York community that once prospered during the manufacturing boom, got a spot of good news Friday.

A total of 575 jobs are coming to the small city, after Amtrak awarded an Elmira-based company a contract to build 130 new train cars.

CAF USA, a subsidiary of a Spanish rail manufacturer, will build the single-level rail cars and hire hundreds for manufacturing and assembly work at its plant in Elmira. The first car is scheduled to be completed in October 2012.

The five-year contract, worth $298.1 million, is the first step in a fleet renewal plan. Amtrak said the new cars will replace some old fleet cars still in use -- including some built in the 1940s and 1950s.

The car replacements will save money and improve trains' on-time performance, Amtrak added. The company plans to replace its entire fleet over the next 30 years. To top of page

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