Our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy have changed.

By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to the new Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.

Fed to protect consumers from abusive mortgages

By Tami Luhby, senior writer


NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) -- The Federal Reserve Board issued new rules Monday to protect consumers from abusive mortgage lending practices.

The new regulations, which take effect April 1, will ban lenders from paying mortgage originators more for putting borrowers in more expensive loans. Consumer advocates have long decried the incentive, known as "yield spread premium," saying it steers homebuyers into loans with higher interest rates.

Under the new rules, lenders will also have to disclose how borrowers' payments could change over time, including the maximum amount that could be owed under an adjustable rate loan. Homebuyers will also have to be told about any balloon payments due at the end of the loan's term.

The Federal Reserve has been tightening mortgage lending regulations in the wake of the housing bust. The Wall Street reform act recently passed by Congress includes similar provisions, but also addresses practices not covered by the board's new regulations. The Fed plans to implement the act's provisions in the future. To top of page

Search for Jobs

Index Last Change % Change
Dow 19,827.25 94.85 0.48%
Nasdaq 5,555.33 15.25 0.28%
S&P 500 2,271.31 7.62 0.34%
Treasuries 2.47 0.01 0.33%
Data as of 6:05am ET
Company Price Change % Change
Bank of America Corp... 22.64 0.11 0.49%
General Electric Co 30.53 -0.68 -2.18%
Bristol-Myers Squibb... 49.23 -6.26 -11.28%
CSX Corp 44.33 -1.18 -2.59%
Chesapeake Energy Co... 6.69 0.07 1.06%
Data as of Jan 20
Sponsors

Sections

Shares of several uranium miners are soaring this year on hopes that Donald Trump will commit more investments to nuclear power. But investors need to get careful. The stocks are as volatile as radioactive elements. More

President Trump promised to 'buy American and hire American.' He says his policies will create 25 million new jobs, the most of any U.S. president in history. CNNMoney lays out just how hard that will be. More

Apple is suing Qualcomm for allegedly charging 'excessive royalties' and withholding payments in retaliation for Apple cooperating with a regulatory investigation into the chip supplier. More

If you're smart about when you first claim Social Security, you can increase your benefits and reap the rewards for the rest of your life. More