Our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy have changed.

By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to the new Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.

Illinois sheriff may halt evictions

dart.gi.top.jpgCook County sheriff Thomas J. Dart has asked three banks for assurances that their foreclosures are proper. By Charles Riley, staff reporter


NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) -- The sheriff of Cook County, Illinois says he will stop evicting residents from foreclosed properties unless he is assured that the foreclosures are legitimate.

Sheriff Thomas J. Dart mailed letters to Bank of America (BAC, Fortune 500), JP Morgan Chase (JPM, Fortune 500) and Ally Financial on Friday asking that they provide complete assurance that foreclosures were done properly and legally.

If Dart is not satisfied with their response, he will halt evictions starting Monday.

"I can't possibly be expected to evict people from their homes when the banks themselves can't say for sure everything was done properly," Dart said in a statement. "I need some kind of assurance that we aren't evicting families based on fraudulent behavior by the banks."

Each bank is conducting a review of documents, and all say they have found no improper foreclosures.

Dart previously halted foreclosures in the county, which includes the city of Chicago, in 2008, alleging that tenants were not being properly notified that the home they were living in was in foreclosure.

According to the sheriff's office, the county currently has 500 evictions ready to be served, while another 1,000 are being prepped.

Foreclosures performed by Bank of America, JP Morgan Chase and Ally financial account for one third of foreclosures Dart isn't the only elected official to investigate the foreclosure document mess.

State attorneys general have stepped up pressure on banks in recent weeks after it was revealed that some bank employees had signed foreclosure affidavits without verifying that the documents were accurate, a process known as "robo-signing."

On Monday, Bank of America restarted the foreclosure process in the 23 states where a court must sign off on the proceedings. The company said the first of the new affidavits will be submitted by Oct. 25, and that it will continue its review in 27 other states.

Ally has previously announced that it was temporarily suspending evictions and post-foreclosure closings in the 23 states in which judges must sign off before someone loses their home.  To top of page


Overnight Avg Rate Latest Change Last Week
30 yr fixed3.36%3.43%
15 yr fixed2.65%2.69%
5/1 ARM2.87%2.93%
30 yr refi3.40%3.46%
15 yr refi2.69%2.73%
Rate data provided
by Bankrate.com
View rates in your area
 
Find personalized rates:
  • Find Homes for sale
    Real estate and homes for sale on Trulia

  • Property Type
  • Find a home in: New York | Atlanta | Chicago | Los Angeles
  • Washington D.C | Houston | Philadelphia | More options
Index Last Change % Change
Dow 18,432.24 -24.11 -0.13%
Nasdaq 5,162.13 7.15 0.14%
S&P 500 2,173.60 3.54 0.16%
Treasuries 1.46 -0.05 -3.51%
Data as of 10:07am ET
Company Price Change % Change
KeyCorp 11.70 0.05 0.43%
Bank of America Corp... 14.49 -0.19 -1.29%
Ford Motor Co 12.66 -0.05 -0.39%
General Electric Co 31.14 -0.11 -0.35%
Chesapeake Energy Co... 5.42 0.23 4.43%
Data as of Jul 29

Sections

For the first time ever, Amazon and Facebook are more valuable than Berkshire Hathaway, the storied company run by legendary investor Warren Buffett. More

Venezuela's government issues a decree recently that makes it possible to force workers to work in the country's fields amid food shortages. More

Sheryl Sandberg says she supports Hillary Clinton for president, because she would help close the gender gap, and because she's 'the most qualified candidate.' More

It's about to get harder for some luxury all-cash home buyers to hide their identity from the U.S. government. More