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No more cell phones for 48,000 California workers

By Tami Luhby, senior writer


NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- Don't get too attached to those work cell phones, California employees. Half of you are going to lose them in coming months.

In his first executive order, Gov. Jerry Brown is requiring the return of 48,000 government-paid cell phones by June 1. He said he found it difficult to believe that 40% of state employees needed a work phone.

The move will save the cash-strapped state $20 million a year. It comes a day after Brown announced a draconian budget plan that will cut $12 billion in spending and maintain $12 billion in tax hikes.

"In the face of a multi-billion dollar budget deficit, a cell phone may not seem like a big expense," Brown said. "But spending $20 million, and perhaps far more than that, on cell phones can't be justified. We're facing a budget crisis in California and I want to achieve all possible, reasonable savings."  To top of page

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