Our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy have changed.

By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to the new Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.

New unemployment claims decline by 10,000

By Ben Rooney, staff reporter


NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- The number of Americans filing first-time claims for unemployment benefits fell by 10,000 last week, while the overall jobless rolls also declined, according to a government report released Thursday.

There were 382,000 initial jobless claims filed in the week ended April 2, the Labor Department said. The figure was down from the previous week's revised 392,000.

Economists were expecting 386,000 initial claims in the latest report, according to consensus estimates gathered by Briefing.com.

Initial claims filings have been on the decline for several months, raising hopes that the recovery in the job market is gaining steam. The government said last week that the U.S. economy added 216,000 jobs in March, while the unemployment rate edged down to 8.8%.

In addition to the drop in initial claims, the number of Americans filing ongoing claims for unemployment benefits fell 9,000 to 3,723,000 in the week ended March 26, the most recent week available. To top of page

Search for Jobs

Index Last Change % Change
Dow 19,437.23 185.45 0.96%
Nasdaq 5,363.28 30.28 0.57%
S&P 500 2,228.22 15.99 0.72%
Treasuries 2.35 -0.05 -2.05%
Data as of 1:27pm ET
Company Price Change % Change
Bank of America Corp... 22.13 -0.03 -0.16%
Chesapeake Energy Co... 7.77 0.19 2.46%
Micron Technology In... 20.34 1.28 6.72%
Pfizer Inc 30.86 -0.70 -2.20%
Wells Fargo & Co 56.45 0.90 1.62%
Data as of 1:12pm ET
Sponsors

Sections

President of local union representing Carrier workers says Trump has only fulfilled half his promise to stop jobs from being shipped to Mexico. More

For Americans under age 40, about half of them say they can't come up with $2,000 if an emergency came up, according to the New York Federal Reserve. More

Trump's transition team has invited top technology execs to meet with the president-elect next week in New York. More

For Americans under age 40, about half of them say they can't come up with $2,000 if an emergency came up, according to the New York Federal Reserve. More