Our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy have changed.

By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to the new Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.

What happens if Congress blows the debt ceiling?

Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner has urged lawmakers to raise the country's debt ceiling by early summer, preferably sooner.Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner has urged lawmakers to raise the country's debt ceiling by early summer, preferably sooner. By Jeanne Sahadi, senior writer


NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- Some Republican lawmakers are challenging Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner's warnings about the grave consequences of not raising the country's debt ceiling.

Geithner has said the country would risk default if Congress doesn't raise the country's legal borrowing limit by July 8.

Just pay the interest on the debt to bondholders -- that'll prevent default, Geithner's critics say.

Indeed, the Treasury Department takes in about $177 billion a month on average. And interest on public debt only costs $19 billion.

That's good. He can pay the interest. But it's hardly the whole story.

Average monthly spending -- minus interest -- is $276 billion. That means Geithner will be short $118 billion every month to pay all the bills the country has incurred.

But just talking "averages" can be deceiving, because monthly spending and revenue are "bumpy month to month," said former Congressional Budget Office acting director Donald Marron.

Translation: There may be times when Geithner comes up far shorter than $118 billion.

Either way, he would be put in the completely ridiculous position of having to prioritize who besides bondholders should get paid first and which federal contractors and programs would be effectively issued I.O.U.s payable when Congress comes to its senses and raises the debt ceiling.

That could mean deferring payments to Social Security beneficiaries, Medicare doctors, weapons vendors or taxpayers expecting refunds.

It's a ridiculous position to put any treasury secretary in because the debt ceiling is not a cause of rising debt or a "license to spend more" -- as some incorrectly allege. It simply authorizes Treasury to pay the bills Congress chose to incur when it passed years worth of spending increases and tax cuts that are now law.

"The decisions that create the need to borrow are made separately from -- and generally earlier than -- the decision about the debt limit," according to a report from the Government Accountability Office.

In any case, paying bondholders first while shirking other obligations wouldn't necessarily protect the country from the perception that it's in default.

Geithner himself equated the situation to a homeowner who pays his mortgage but puts off his car loan, credit cards, insurance premiums and utilities. Even though the mortgage would be taken care of, the homeowner's credit could still be damaged.

Since it's never happened before, it's not clear to anyone -- no matter what they say -- how markets, businesses or average Joes would view the country if it has to indefinitely stiff contractors or government programs.

What is clear, however, is that the situation wouldn't exactly bolster the United States' reputation.

"There's a hard-to-make-tangible loss of face for the United States. It's embarrassing," Marron said.

The long-term debt situation absolutely needs to be addressed. But it's a mystery why lawmakers -- so all of a sudden flummoxed about the problem they helped create -- would actually want to risk borrowing yet more trouble for the country just to make the political point that they're really serious about fiscal responsibility.

Especially since it's their job to responsibly manage the country's books all the time, not just when they create the threat of a crisis that, handled badly, could hurt the country's financing and credit reputation.  To top of page

Index Last Change % Change
Dow 16,058.35 -469.68 -2.84%
Nasdaq 4,636.11 -140.40 -2.94%
S&P 500 1,913.85 -58.33 -2.96%
Treasuries 2.17 -0.03 -1.27%
Data as of 2:30am ET
Company Price Change % Change
Bank of America Corp... 15.58 0.05 0.32%
Apple Inc 107.72 -5.04 -4.47%
General Electric Co 23.88 -0.94 -3.79%
Ford Motor Co 13.72 -0.15 -1.08%
Microsoft Corp 41.82 -1.70 -3.91%
Data as of Sep 1
Sponsors

Sections

McDonald's has been testing an all-day breakfast menu in several markets for months. Now it has said when the change will go nationwide: October 6. More

Iran could be pumping more than four million barrels of oil a day by the end of 2016, the country's oil minister tells CNN in an exclusive interview. More

How do you run a successful crowdfunding campaign? Indiegogo's CEO Slava Rubin offers his top tips and mistakes to avoid. More

Here's what you need to earn to afford a home in the 27 biggest metro areas in the country, according to HSH.com. More