Working at 70, what's her 401(k) RMD

By Amelia Ross, editor


NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) -- Question: My mother is still working and contributes to her 401(k). She turned 70 in June; is she required to take required minimum deductions from this plan? -- T. Kaufman, Waterford, Mich.

Answer: In 2009, Congress passed a law temporarily suspending required minimum distributions (RMDs) for 2009 because markets had performed so poorly in 2008 and many retirement portfolios were decimated. That RMD holiday is over.

Normally a person 70 ½ must withdraw by April 1 of the year following turning the age of 70½.

But because your mother is still an active employee and still participates in the 401(k), she doesn't have to withdraw funds. (Assuming she is not an owner of 5% or more of the company.)

"But check with her employer. Rarely, the employer's plan requires participants to begin receiving distributions after April 1 of the year following the age of 70 ½," said Steve Koshers, partner at Koshers & Co., CPAs, Merrick, N.Y.

However, working or not, you must begin withdrawing from an IRA at 70 ½ based upon an IRS withdrawal formula.  To top of page

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